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June 26, 2008

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Mike Myatt

I wholeheartedly concur with your assessment of the critical role that decisioning plays in the world of leaders. You might be interested in reading a post on decisioning that I authored sometime back which shares some additional thoughts on the topic at hand. It can be viewed at: http://www.n2growth.com/blog/?p=142

Guy Harris

I really like your comment on great leaders knowing themselves. I agree with your assessment that self-knowledge is a pre-requisite for good decisions. This thought aligns well with what Daniel Goleman commented on in Primal Leadership as he discussed the importance of emotional intelligence. Good post.

BTW - I found you through a link on Kevin Eikeberry's blog. He's a friend and colleague of mine. I thought I would check out the top 10 finalists. I like what I see.

Guy Harris

I really like your comment on great leaders knowing themselves. I agree with your assessment that self-knowledge is a pre-requisite for good decisions. This thought aligns well with what Daniel Goleman commented on in Primal Leadership as he discussed the importance of emotional intelligence. Good post.

BTW - I found you through a link on Kevin Eikeberry's blog. He's a friend and colleague of mine. I thought I would check out the top 10 finalists. I like what I see.

Gary Cohen

Leaders must ask the question first, "Who's decision is it?" Often I find that exceptional leaders will do everything they can to answer this question with, "Theirs".
If the leader make the decision they reduce there effort to build leadership and accountability within their own team. There is certainly an important role in decision making for leaders - it just seems too important a role in building muscle strength on the team by making too many of them by the leader. Additionally, if one does weigh in with a decision, it would be critically important that the team was involved because the best decision in the world without buy in from the troops is likely to fail. Thoughts?

Umesh Ramakrishnan

I read this posting with interest. As someone who meets with many CEOs every week, I'm always trying to guage the decision making capability of each of those leaders. There are clearly two kinds of decision makers - ones that go with their gut and others who pore through data quickly and make an analytical decision. The ones that are the most effective are ones that use both methods simultaneously. Staying completely on one side of that spectrum makes one a leader that could risk the business while the other end of the spectrum leads to paralysis through analysis.

Aaron Sandoski

Your posting hit home with me. I have spent the last four years researching how wise leaders make tough decisions. The result of which is coming out in September and called How The Wise Decide (Crown Business). What my co-author and I found is that great decision-making extends far beyond analytcal skills or a refined gut instinct. It stems from six universal principles of source information, debate with candor, overcoming loss aversion, vision, purposeful listening, and transparency. Decision-making is the cornerstone of leadership, too bad it goes neglected in most leadership training.

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